These tips are helpful both in the classroom and at home:
  • Keep instructions short and use simple vocabulary where possible.
  • Use visual aids to back up what you are saying, for example: pictures to support instructions and use of objects during practical lessons.
  • Explain to the class at the start of the lesson what you are going to cover. 
  • You may use a mind map: this will help focus the child's attention and can act as a visual memory aid- the child can refer back to it throughout the lesson. 
  • You could also use a task board: this will have the same benefits. 
  • You could write key parts of the instruction on the board for the class to refer back to.  Use an approach that is most suited to the literacy levels of your child. 
  • Define difficult vocabulary: write in on the board and refer to the new word at least five times, including getting the child to say the word.
  • If you need to give a specific instruction to a child: refer to them by name.
  • Ask your child to feedback what you want them to do to ensure that they have retained your instructions.
  • If you have a pupil that has particular difficulties with auditory memory sit them near the front of the class, or to the side of you depending on how the class is set out.
  • Try not to talk for extended periods, as children with auditory memory difficulties tend to shut off.  You could give the child a task at a time.
  • If you are reading a book to a child, ask frequent questions about the content of the book.
  • If a child has auditory memory difficulties it may be beneficial to sit them next to a peer that is better and listening and staying on task.  They may be able to ask their peer for help. 
  • Encourage pupils to take quick, short notes during lessons to help them remember what they have to do.  Notes can be pictorial or words depending on what works for that particular individual.